26 NOV weekly news template

EU LEADERS TAKE 38 MINUTES TO SIGN OFF ON THERESA MAY’S BREXIT DEAL

It took 38 minutes for the EU leaders to sign off on the Brexit deal. There was talk of sadness and a slightly mournful air to the brief proceedings, one source said. The 27 leaders agreed that when they let Theresa May into their meeting they wanted to ask her about “next steps.” They did not, I am told, mean future trade negotiations but meant how on earth she was going to get the deal through Parliament. They didn’t, I’m told, learn much that was new from that second session. Theresa May just told them she intended to deliver the deal. – Channel 4 News

COMMISSION PRESIDENT JEAN-CLAUDE JUNCKER DECLARES THE AGREEMENT “THE BEST DEAL POSSIBLE”

Jean-Claude Juncker said the agreement was “the best deal possible” and that the EU would not change its “fundamental position”. The president’s comments are part of an EU-wide push to convince British MPs that the plan is worth backing. The arithmetic in the House of Commons currently suggests it will be rejected by a wide margin if nothing changes. Mr Juncker described Britain’s departure as a “tragic moment”. “I would vote in favour of this deal because this is the best deal possible for Britain,” he told reporters on the doorstep of a Brussels summit to sign off the deal. “This is the deal. It’s the best deal possible and the EU will not change its fundamental position when it comes to these issues.” He added: “The UK leaving the EU is a tragic moment. Not a moment to celebrate.” – Independent

Theresa May at bbc newsLAURA KUENSSBERG: MAY’S MESSAGE – ‘THIS IS ALL THERE IS’

The talking in Brussels is done. After nearly two years of negotiations, arguments – and the inevitable moments where it felt like the process would explode – there is, now, a deal. It’s a compromise. It was always going to be. It’s not a happy compromise either. People on both sides of the Brexit argument are already screaming their protests. And although the prime minister must be relieved, she didn’t exactly say that she was pleased about the deal when I asked her at a news conference this lunchtime. Instead, she said she was sure the country’s best days are ahead. But however she really feels about it – and with this prime minister it is hard to tell – her strategy for the next couple of weeks is crystal clear. Her case? This is all there is. However the prime minister looks, however she sounds in the next fortnight, the levels of unhappiness at home are so profound that her pleas may fall on deaf ears. – Laura Kuenssberg for BBC News

THERESA MAY WARNS TORY AND LABOUR MPS: BACK MY DEAL OR GET VOTED OUT

Theresa May has warned MPs from all parties they will lose their seats if they ignore the will of their constituents by voting down her Brexit deal. After European leaders rubber-stamped the deal in Brussels on Sunday, the Prime Minister insisted it represented a final offer that could not be renegotiated, and that she had no “Plan B” if it was rejected. She said: “I believe, when it comes to it, MPs will be thinking about the need to deliver on the vote of the British people and will be thinking about the impact of this deal on their constituents. “I think their constituents want to ensure that their jobs and livelihoods are protected and that’s what this deal does.” – Telegraph (£)

COMMISSION PRESIDENT JEAN-CLAUDE JUNCKER DECLARES THE AGREEMENT “THE BEST DEAL POSSIBLE”

Jean-Claude Juncker said the agreement was “the best deal possible” and that the EU would not change its “fundamental position”. The president’s comments are part of an EU-wide push to convince British MPs that the plan is worth backing. The arithmetic in the House of Commons currently suggests it will be rejected by a wide margin if nothing changes. Mr Juncker described Britain’s departure as a “tragic moment”. “I would vote in favour of this deal because this is the best deal possible for Britain,” he told reporters on the doorstep of a Brussels summit to sign off the deal. “This is the deal. It’s the best deal possible and the EU will not change its fundamental position when it comes to these issues.” He added: “The UK leaving the EU is a tragic moment. Not a moment to celebrate.” – Independent

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